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MORE DOUBTS RAISED ON FIRED MIT PROFESSOR
[THIRD Edition]
Boston Globe - Boston, Mass.
Subjects: Plagiarism; False information; Biomedical research; Firings
Author: Marcella Bombardieri and Gareth Cook, Globe Staff
Date: Oct 29, 2005
Start Page: A.1
Section: Metro/Region
Abstract (Document Summary)

The two papers that came to light yesterday were written while [Van Parijs] worked as a graduate student at Brigham and Women's Hospital, studying the immune system. The new papers combined with one determined to be fraudulent by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and two others being investigated by the California Institute of Technology, where he worked from 1998 to 2000 expand the scope of questions that now surround Van Parijs, 35. He was dismissed Wednesday after MIT said he admitted to fabricating and falsifying data in a paper, as well as in unpublished manuscripts and grant applications.

[Abul Abbas] said he considered Van Parijs an extremely prolific scientist, but said he never had a reason to suspect that Van Parijs might be cutting corners. "I always thought he was extremely industrious, and he put in long hours in the lab," said Abbas. "I used to see a lot of primary data when he was in the lab, and it looked fine. There was really no reason to doubt what he was doing."

After Van Parijs earned his doctorate, he joined the lab of Nobel laureate David Baltimore, first at MIT and then at the California Institute of Technology, where Baltimore is now president. Even though Caltech is scrutinizing two of the papers Van Parijs published while there, both in the journal Immunity in 1999, Baltimore said he knows from work that his lab has done following up on Van Parijs's research that a lot of what he did is, in fact, verifiable.

The two papers that came to light yesterday were written while [Luk Van Parijs] worked as a graduate student at Brigham and Women's Hospital, studying the immune system. The new papers combined with one determined to be fraudulent by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and two others being investigated by the California Institute of Technology, where he worked from 1998 to 2000 expand the scope of questions that now surround Van Parijs, 35. He was dismissed Wednesday after MIT said he admitted to fabricating and falsifying data in a paper, as well as in unpublished manuscripts and grant applications.

[Abul Abbas] said he considered Van Parijs an extremely prolific scientist, but said he never had a reason to suspect that Van Parijs might be cutting corners. "I always thought he was extremely industrious, and he put in long hours in the lab," said Abbas. "I used to see a lot of primary data when he was in the lab, and it looked fine. There was really no reason to doubt what he was doing."

After Van Parijs earned his doctorate, he joined the lab of Nobel laureate David Baltimore, first at MIT and then at the California Institute of Technology, where Baltimore is now president. Even though Caltech is scrutinizing two of the papers Van Parijs published while there, both in the journal Immunity in 1999, Baltimore said he knows from work that his lab has done following up on Van Parijs's research that a lot of what he did is, in fact, verifiable.

The two papers that came to light yesterday were written while [Luk Van Parijs] worked as a graduate student at Brigham and Women's Hospital, studying the immune system. The new papers combined with one determined to be fraudulent by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and two others being investigated by the California Institute of Technology, where he worked from 1998 to 2000 expand the scope of questions that now surround Van Parijs, 35. He was dismissed Wednesday after MIT said he admitted to fabricating and falsifying data in a paper, as well as in unpublished manuscripts and grant applications.

[Abul Abbas] said he considered Van Parijs an extremely prolific scientist, but said he never had a reason to suspect that Van Parijs might be cutting corners. "I always thought he was extremely industrious, and he put in long hours in the lab," said Abbas. "I used to see a lot of primary data when he was in the lab, and it looked fine. There was really no reason to doubt what he was doing."

After Van Parijs earned his doctorate, he joined the lab of Nobel laureate David Baltimore, first at MIT and then at the California Institute of Technology, where Baltimore is now president. Even though Caltech is scrutinizing two of the papers Van Parijs published while there, both in the journal Immunity in 1999, Baltimore said he knows from work that his lab has done following up on Van Parijs's research that a lot of what he did is, in fact, verifiable.

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